Phototherapy Specialist

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Phototherapy is the use of light to treat skin disorders.  The phototherapy unit emits specific wavelengths of light proven to benefit patients with various skin disorders. We offer Narrowband UVB. Narrowband UVB phototherapy uses UVB light rays without the use of an oral medication. Narrowband UVB is the most common form of phototherapy used to treat skin diseases. “Narrowband” refers to a specific wavelength of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, 311 to 312 nm. UVB phototherapy was formerly provided as a broadband source (290 to 320 nm). Please contact us to schedule a consultation or to refer a patient. 

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What is PRP?

What is Phototherapy

Phototherapy is the use of light to treat skin disorders.  The phototherapy unit emits specific wavelengths of light proven to benefit patients with various skin disorders. We offer Narrowband UVB. Narrowband UVB phototherapy uses UVB light rays without the use of an oral medication. Narrowband UVB is the most common form of phototherapy used to treat skin diseases. “Narrowband” refers to a specific wavelength of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, 311 to 312 nm. UVB phototherapy was formerly provided as a broadband source (290 to 320 nm). Please contact us to schedule a consultation or to refer a patient. 

How does it work?

UVB improves skin diseases because the immune cells of the skin, overactive in many skin diseases, are shut down by UVB. The effect of UVB is similar to sunlight. Excessive exposure causes premature aging of the skin and increases the risk of skin cancer. There are guidelines as to how many times UVB can be done safely. Initially most patients have their treatment three times a week for a total of 20 to 30 treatments. The first few exposures will be couple of minutes or so. The length of exposure is gradually increased aiming to turn the skin slightly pink. After a few months, a weekly maintenance treatment is often advised. This is especially important when conditions other than psoriasis are being treated. Psoriasis may remain clear for some months before flaring up again. NB-UVB treatment can be performed in a booth or with a wand (scalp and hard to reach areas).

What Conditions can be treated? 

  • Atopic dermatitis / Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Pruritus (itching)
  • Graft-versus-Host Disease (GVHD)
  • Vitiligo
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)
  • Lichen planus
  • Granuloma annulare
  • Pityriasis rosea
  • Acne,
  • Diseases of the hands and feet
  • Deramtographism
  • Polymorphous Light Eruption (PMLE)

What are the Side effects and risks?

Significant side effects are uncommon, but a mild sunburn is not. It is at it’s worst about 8 hours after the treatment and fades over the next few days. A severe blistering burn is rare when UVB is properly administered but can happen. Everyone will develop some degree of tan. Sometimes, after several rounds of UVB white and brown spots will appear on the skin. An occasional person will get worse or itch more from UVB.

The dermatologist must be told if any new medications are started, as some will make the skin abnormally sensitive to UVB. Apply mineral oil, baby oil or Vaseline to all scaly areas and SPF 15 or greater sunscreen to the face and hands before each treatment. Do not apply any prescription ointments or cosmetics to the affected areas until after the UVB treatment. Protective goggles and groin protection (underwear or towel) must be worn while getting the treatment. To protect the face from skin aging, a makeshift hood can be made from a brown paper shopping bag.

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